Dorchester (Part 2)

This article by Br. Leo Ryan, CSV, was published in Bulletin No. 239 of the Iowa Postal History Association in the fourth quarter of 2006.

(Continued from last issue)

The fourth postmaster recorded in the United States Postal History archives is Thomas Danaher. He succeeded Eugene Bums on March 21, 1894 and served until January 19, 1898 a period of three years and ten months. He entered upon his appointment during the Administration of President Grover Cleveland and continued only briefly during the Administration of President William McKinley. The Official Register of the United States shows his compensation for 1895 as $111.62 and for 1897 as $121.88. There is no record or memory of how or whether this Thomas Danaher was related to Thomas A. Danaher and his descendents. He is, however, buried in the St. Mary Parish Cemetery in Dorchester. Continue reading “Dorchester (Part 2)”

Dorchester, Part One

Dorchester, Iowa is located in Section 14 of Waterloo Township, the northwestern most township in Allamakee County. Waterloo Township contains an area smaller than any other Allamakee County township, except Fairfield on the Mississippi. Waterloo Township consists of30 full sections and a narrow strip to the north of only six sections south of the Minnesota state line. Waterloo Township was organized from Union City by an order of the Allamakee County Court, March 3, 1856.
Ellery M. Hancock in his history of Allamakee County notes that “The earliest settlement seems to have been made in the Northeast corner, in 1851, by Mrs. Jas. Robinson and her sons, on Portland Prairie.”(1) Hancock also wrote that “In the northern part of the (Union City) Township, G.W. Carver was among the earliest arrivals, moving on what is called Portland Prairie in May 1852, and securing a large claim.(2)
In 1852 the township population was 157 persons….

This article by Br. Leo Ryan, CSV, was published in Bulletin No. 238 of the Iowa Postal History Association in the third quarter of 2006.

Dorchester, Iowa is located in Section 14 of Waterloo Township, the northwestern most township in Allamakee County. Waterloo Township contains an area smaller than any other Allamakee County township, except Fairfield on the Mississippi. Waterloo Township consists of30 full sections and a narrow strip to the north of only six sections south of the Minnesota state line. Waterloo Township was organized from Union City by an order of the Allamakee County Court, March 3, 1856.

Ellery M. Hancock in his history of Allamakee County notes that “The earliest settlement seems to have been made in the Northeast corner, in 1851, by Mrs. Jas. Robinson and her sons, on Portland Prairie.”(1) Continue reading “Dorchester, Part One”

Capoli: The Village History Forgot

This article by Br. Leo Ryan, CSV, was published in Bulletin No. 233 of the Iowa Postal History Association in the third quarter of 2005.

Before the United States became a country (July 4, 1776) and before Iowa was a territory (February 6, 1838) or a state (December 28, 1846) and long before Allamakee County was established (January 15, 1849) Capoli existed. Capoli (CAP-oh-li) was the name given to an important riverboat and explorer landmark along the Mississippi River. Capoli designates a unique, geologically dramatic, two-mile angled bluff rising 420 feet above the Mississippi, just below present day Lansing, Iowa.

Capoli village and post office took their name from this neighboring bluff. Capoli was settled on a small tract of land on the south side of Paint Creek at the point where the Creek empties into the Mississippi.
Continue reading “Capoli: The Village History Forgot”